redscharlach:

We now interrupt this Tumblr for a message from our Sontaran sponsor.

redscharlach:

We now interrupt this Tumblr for a message from our Sontaran sponsor.


grijzegans:

MAD Magazine recreates Norman Rockwell’s famous 1958 painting ‘The Runaway’

(via angrypalemexican)


transitmaps:

Submission - Historical Map: Chicago CTA Rapid Transit Map, 1983
Submitted by our resident repository of Chicago transit map knowledge, Dennis McClendon, who says:
This map of Chicago’s rapid transit network originated in the 1970s (this one is from June 1983), and this style was used until routes received color names in 1993. Happily, by that time digital printing in fiberglass-embedded signs made full-color maps easier to place in graffiti-prone environments.
These maps were silk-screened onto [blue] color blanks, and every color of ink added cost. So the CTA’s six lines are represented by using only two colors. Simple black is used for three “extension” lines that never overlap. A simple white line is used for the north-south line those connect with. For the two other through routes: black with white casing and white with black casing.
The side ticks for stations work fine, but a box for the places where transfers are possible is not altogether intuitive.  The CTA of that era employed skip-stop spacing, so alternate trains stopped at A or B stations only. Another graphic decision that might have deserved more thought:  the names of various suburbs—only a few of which can be reached by rapid transit—floating in their vague geographic positions, but no indication of Chicago city limits or Lake Michigan.
——
Transit Maps says:
I have to say that I actually really like the forced graphic simplicity of this map. There’s only two colours to work with, so every element has to be very carefully considered and balanced against others for the map to work at all. That it manages to keep the route lines recognisable and separated in the downtown Loop area without the use of an inset map is quite an achievement.
The famous “A-B” stopping patterns are shown pretty deftly as well, being mostly placed on the opposite side of the route line from the station name. The few stations where this doesn’t happen (due to crowding or space limitations) stand out like a sore thumb – Jarvis on the North-South line, and many of the stations on the Ravenswood line. There are also two stations with their labels set at an angle: Merchandise Mart is almost completely unavoidable, but Harvard on the Englewood Line could easily have been fitted in horizontally.
I think the “boxed” interchanges work well enough, having seen similar devices on quite a few maps (the Paris Metro included) now. I also like the extra detail included on the map: station closures on weekends and nights, direction of travel around the Loop, inbound boarding only on the last three stations on the Jackson Park North-South Line, and more.
I would agree with Dennis on the locality names, that just seem to float in space. The biggest offender is “Evergreen Park”, right at the very bottom of the map, below the legend!
As for depicting Lake Michigan, that seems like a good idea, but I struggle to think of a way of doing it without upsetting the delicate balance of the map. You can’t really use a white line, as that could be confused with all the white route lines, and you can’t have a large white area as that would be visually way too heavy. In the end, the lake isn’t that important for such a graphically stylised map (it really just delineates the eastern side of the map), so I’m not too upset by its absence.
Our rating: A fine historical example of how to use a limited colour palette effectively. Minimalist but still effective. Three-and-a-half stars.

transitmaps:

Submission - Historical Map: Chicago CTA Rapid Transit Map, 1983

Submitted by our resident repository of Chicago transit map knowledge, Dennis McClendon, who says:

This map of Chicago’s rapid transit network originated in the 1970s (this one is from June 1983), and this style was used until routes received color names in 1993. Happily, by that time digital printing in fiberglass-embedded signs made full-color maps easier to place in graffiti-prone environments.

These maps were silk-screened onto [blue] color blanks, and every color of ink added cost. So the CTA’s six lines are represented by using only two colors. Simple black is used for three “extension” lines that never overlap. A simple white line is used for the north-south line those connect with. For the two other through routes: black with white casing and white with black casing.

The side ticks for stations work fine, but a box for the places where transfers are possible is not altogether intuitive.  The CTA of that era employed skip-stop spacing, so alternate trains stopped at A or B stations only. Another graphic decision that might have deserved more thought:  the names of various suburbs—only a few of which can be reached by rapid transit—floating in their vague geographic positions, but no indication of Chicago city limits or Lake Michigan.

——

Transit Maps says:

I have to say that I actually really like the forced graphic simplicity of this map. There’s only two colours to work with, so every element has to be very carefully considered and balanced against others for the map to work at all. That it manages to keep the route lines recognisable and separated in the downtown Loop area without the use of an inset map is quite an achievement.

The famous “A-B” stopping patterns are shown pretty deftly as well, being mostly placed on the opposite side of the route line from the station name. The few stations where this doesn’t happen (due to crowding or space limitations) stand out like a sore thumb – Jarvis on the North-South line, and many of the stations on the Ravenswood line. There are also two stations with their labels set at an angle: Merchandise Mart is almost completely unavoidable, but Harvard on the Englewood Line could easily have been fitted in horizontally.

I think the “boxed” interchanges work well enough, having seen similar devices on quite a few maps (the Paris Metro included) now. I also like the extra detail included on the map: station closures on weekends and nights, direction of travel around the Loop, inbound boarding only on the last three stations on the Jackson Park North-South Line, and more.

I would agree with Dennis on the locality names, that just seem to float in space. The biggest offender is “Evergreen Park”, right at the very bottom of the map, below the legend!

As for depicting Lake Michigan, that seems like a good idea, but I struggle to think of a way of doing it without upsetting the delicate balance of the map. You can’t really use a white line, as that could be confused with all the white route lines, and you can’t have a large white area as that would be visually way too heavy. In the end, the lake isn’t that important for such a graphically stylised map (it really just delineates the eastern side of the map), so I’m not too upset by its absence.

Our rating: A fine historical example of how to use a limited colour palette effectively. Minimalist but still effective. Three-and-a-half stars.

3.5 Stars


trashfriend:

little things that actually make a difference to general life happiness:
•drinking lots of water
•eating fresh fruit
•thinking positively about yourself and others
•washing your face twice a day
•changing your sheets once a week
•hot baths with Epsom salts
•face masks using things in your house
•sleeping more than 7 hours per night
•reorganizing your clothes, makeup, possessions etc
•keeping your living space clean

(via adventuresinblunderland)


adventuresinblunderland:

jennmundia:

pardonmewhileipanic:

chocohawlic:

empty-venus:

Breaking news: White fuckboys on twitter bitching how funny it is that Beyoncé is a feminist when she and her dancers were provocative and half naked. Despite feminism being about empowerment and a woman’s right to do whatever the hell she pleases with it, they just don’t seem to be able to grasp this concept.

In other news, men still don’t know what feminism is, still bitter that they aren’t Beyoncé and still making themselves look like asses on the internet.

And now the weather.

I bet 5 minutes later they slid up in some DM’s asking for nudes

you know these assholes had NO PROBLEM with anything in her show until that word popped up

it’s not nudity they have a problem with

it’s a woman who is empowered and in control of how when and why she dresses and dances how she wants

when their precious male gaze is questioned or dismissed, suddenly she’s a terrible feminist, and they try and shame her for the very thing that was turning them on seconds before

preeeeeeach.

FUUUUUUUCK dudes thinking everything a woman does with her body is for a man’s benefit. Sexuality is not just for men. Every move, every garment, every facial expression, IT IS NOT FOR YOU. EVERYTHING IS NOT YOURS.


nervouspearl:

"Where do you think you are? Look around you. You’ve made it. The Promised Land.

P a r a d i s e.”

I loved this actress on Green Wing, and I’m excited to see where this story goes.

(via angrypalemexican)


donschaffner:

I’m thinking about a new sign for my office.
n.b. Back to Work with After Dark Post-Shows: Back to Work 184: Days of Bathrooms Pasthttp://overca.st/BFHtg27ic

donschaffner:

I’m thinking about a new sign for my office.

n.b. Back to Work with After Dark Post-Shows: Back to Work 184: Days of Bathrooms Past
http://overca.st/BFHtg27ic

(via merlin)


kaci3po:

afro-dominicano:

zenkitty714:

unlockaflockofwords:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.  Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

IT GENUINELY IS NO COINCIDENCE THAT BLACK PEOPLE GET IMPRISONED WAY THE HELL MORE THAN WHITE PEOPLE. THIS IS HOW SLAVERY CARRIED THE FUCK ON.

For-profit prisons are a huge business and this is part of why. 
Also, did you know that it’s in the Constitution that people convicted of crimes can be used as slave labor? That’s another part of the Constitution that needs to be changed. 

If you changed that part of the constitution you’re essentially removing a strong leg of the prison industrial complex

I believe most state governments benefit from this, too. I work for my state government and most of the furniture and fixtures in my office were built by prisoners. I can’t speak for other states since I don’t know how they operate, but at least in WV, this applies to state government buildings, too.

kaci3po:

afro-dominicano:

zenkitty714:

unlockaflockofwords:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.

Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

IT GENUINELY IS NO COINCIDENCE THAT BLACK PEOPLE GET IMPRISONED WAY THE HELL MORE THAN WHITE PEOPLE. THIS IS HOW SLAVERY CARRIED THE FUCK ON.

For-profit prisons are a huge business and this is part of why. 

Also, did you know that it’s in the Constitution that people convicted of crimes can be used as slave labor? That’s another part of the Constitution that needs to be changed. 

If you changed that part of the constitution you’re essentially removing a strong leg of the prison industrial complex

I believe most state governments benefit from this, too. I work for my state government and most of the furniture and fixtures in my office were built by prisoners. I can’t speak for other states since I don’t know how they operate, but at least in WV, this applies to state government buildings, too.

(via baldeesh)



Conversation I overheard at work

Customer: How can you do this job (stripping)? Isn't it degrading having to take your clothes of for money?
Dancer: You're the guy that just forked out $300 for me to take my clothes off. Isn't it degrading having to pay that much before a girl who looks like me will take her clothes for you?